If Israel Lost the WorldIn the summer of 1967, Richard Z. Chesnoff, Edward Klein and Robert Littell were all working as associate editors in Newsweek’s Foreign Department. About ten days before the Arab-Israeli war began, Chesnoff-who had lived in Israel from 1957 to 1967 and spoke fluent Hebrew-was dispatched to Israel to cover the crisis. In the weeks that followed, he reported from all the battle-fronts and interviewed many of the Israeli leaders involved in the campaign. In New York, Klein and Littell were part of a Newsweek team assigned to write stories on the war itself and its aftermath-coverage that won for Newsweek an award from the Overseas Press Club in New York.

A few weeks after the end of the war the three authors met to explore the hypothetical question of what would have happened if the Arabs had launched a successful air strike against Israel. The idea was not as incredible as it first appeared.  Former Israeli Foreign Minister Golda Meir had privately told the authors: “Just imagine if Nasser had gotten to our airfields first. What would have happened…?”

What would have happened is the subject of this extraordinary dramatic narrative of a nightmare in the Middle East and its repercussions around the world.  Beyond that, the book challenges-with compelling documentation-the conventional wisdom concerning American policy toward Israel-namely, that ultimately Israel’s survival is guaranteed by the United States.

Mixing a tightly woven fabric of hard fact and plausible fiction, If Israel Lost The War goes behind the scenes and explores the decision-making process in the highest power centers from Washington to Moscow. It us a novel that cannot fail to shock, fascinate and forewarn.